Achievements

Alexis Stanley, Class of 2020, is spending her summer as an intern for the Women's National Basketball Players Association in New York City, where she will work on issues related to collective bargaining and player and brand licensing.  After graduation, Alexis plans to specialize in labor law.

Professor Finger's report, which she co-authored with Jane Place Neighborhood Substantiality Initiative, is the first comprehensive report on the escalating eviction crisis in New Orleans. The report maps evictions throughout the city based on a dataset Finger compiled through public records requests.  It shows that the most affordable neighborhoods have the highest eviction rates and makes policy recommendations to lessen displacement. The full report is available at https://jpnsi.org/evictions 

The findings of Professor Imre Szalai's empirical study on the prevalence of consumer arbitration agreements were covered by NBC News and in Time.  Szalai's study found that 81% of the top Fortune 100 companies have used consumer arbitration agreements.  He argues that the widespread use

The Loyola team received 3rd place in annual National Criminal Procedure competition held at University of San Diego School of Law.  42 schools competed in the competition and teammates Rachel Breaux and Bayle Jenkins, coached by Monica Mendoza, placed among the final eight teams overall.  Congratulations!

Emily Bishop, Co-Director of the Lawyering Program and Writing Instructor, has been named a member of the Editorial Board for the Second Draft, a publication of the Legal Writing Institute.  The Second Draft is published twice yearly and features essays, book reviews, and articles on topics of interest to legal writing professionals.

Professor Johanna Kalb and co-author Didi Kuo recently published Reassessing American Democracy: The Enduring Challenge of Racial Exclusion, in the Michigan Law Review Online.  In their essay, Kalb and Kuo argue that the current conversation about American democratic decline fails to acknowledge that the stability of American democracy has long rested on political compromises that exclude communities of color, and they describe how this reframing should reshape current polic

Shaakirrah R. Sanders (JD '01) became the first African-American and second person of color to achieve the rank of full professor at the University of Idaho College of Law. Professor Sanders teaches courses related to U.S. constitutional law and criminal procedure. Professor Sanders has published scholarship on felony sentencing reform; civil and criminal jury trial rights; religious freedom; and agriculture security or “ag-gag” legislation.

3L Leila Abu Orf has been selected to receive the Association of Corporate Counsel Award from the Louisiana Chapter of the Association of Corporate Counsel.  The annual award was created to promote excellence in the field of Corporate Law by offering incentives to talented students.  Leila was nominated for the award by Professor Ray Rabalais.

In his newly published article, Good Faith in Louisiana Property Law, 78 Louisiana Law Review, 1163 (2018), Professor John Lovett explores the concept of good faith plays in four areas of Louisiana law.  Lovett argues that good faith is the crucial mediating device that allows courts to consider both the honesty and carefulness of the parties while deciding whether to reallocate property rights and obligations between the original owner and the new property player.

Professor Sokol is co-editor of a new report from the Center for Progressive Reform.  Titled "From Surviving to Thriving: Equity in Planning and Recovery," the report examines the failures of current public policy that were on display in the lead-up to and in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017. It explores the ways U.S.

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